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Visiting Artist Morgan Craig, Semester Two 2010

Morgan has been with the Painting Workshop since September and will be here until Christmas.
He’s provide a small bio for the blog and some images.
Thanks Morgan, its been a pleasure to have you here!

Morgan Craig has exhibited, and lectured throughout the U.S.A. Canada,
and Europe, including OK Harris in New York City, SPACES in Cleveland,
the Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts and Murray State University
in the bluegrass state of Kentucky. Wexler Gallery, in Philadelphia,
and Lawrence Asher Gallery, in Los Angeles, currently represent him.
Selections from his work will be featured in several upcoming
exhibitions, including a group exhibit at Wayne State University in
Detroit, Michigan, and a two person exhibit at the University of
Minnesota.

Craig has received numerous awards including, the Pollock Krasner
Foundation Grant, the Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation Grant, and the
Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Individual Grant for 2006 and 2008.
He has also been invited to several residencies including, Atelje
Stundars in Finland, the Macdowell Colony, Open Studios/Skolska 28 in
Prague, and Bemis Center for the Contemporary Arts. This is his first
time in Australia.

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November 19, 2010 Posted by | Artwork, Visiting Artist, Workshop | | 1 Comment

Didier Maleuvre workshop

hi all

just confirming that Didier Maleuvre from University of California will be running a workshop for interested postgraduate students on Thursday 22 July.

I’m yet to finalise the details with him but would anticipate something relatively informal — students will be asked to read one or two papers by Didier, he will give a talk for half and hour or so, and then engage the group in discussion relevant to your research projects. I’m copying below summaries of his main works which indicate the kind of thematic ground he is likely to cover; our early communications suggested he might do something broadly on imagination.

If you are interested in participating in this event could you please make contact with me?

thanks, Melinda

melinda.hinkson@anu.edu.au

Museum Memories: History, Technology, Art (Stanford 1999)

From its inception in the early nineteenth century, the museum has been more than a mere historical object; it has manufactured an image of history. In collecting past artifacts, the museum gives shape and presence to history, defining the space of a ritual encounter with the past. The museum believes in history, yet it behaves as though history could be summarized and completed. By building a monument to the end of history and lifting art out of the turmoil of historical survival, the museum is said to dehistoricize the artwork. It replaces historicity with historiography, and living history turns into timelessness.

This twofold process explains the paradoxical character of museums. They have been accused of being both too heavy with historical dust and too historically spotless, excessively historicizing artworks while cutting them off from the historical life in which artworks are born. Thus the museum seems contradictory because it lectures about the historical nature of its objects while denying the same objects the living historical connection about which it purports to educate.

The contradictory character of museums leads the author to a philosophical reflection on history, one that reconsiders the concept of culture and the historical value of art in light of the philosophers, artists, and writers who are captivated by the museum. Together, their voices prompt a reevaluation of the concepts of historical consciousness, artistic identity, and the culture of objects in the modern period. The author shows how museum culture offers a unique vantage point on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries’ preoccupation with history and subjectivity, and he demonstrates how the constitution of the aesthetic provides insight into the realms of technology, industrial culture, architecture, and ethics.

The Religion of Reality: Inquiry into Self, Art and Transcendence (2006, Catholic University of America Press)

The Religion of Reality takes to task the assumption according to which the modern intellect is devoid of the transcendental. The book first argues that religious feeling persists in the secular western mind; that it has taken refuge in the unlikeliest of camps, with the supposed debunker of religious creed: the rationalist existential ego. The autonomous, individual self is the pillar of modern times – a deity that anchors our morals, politics, and society, and defines what is crucial about human existence. On this score, The Religion of Reality makes two points: first that the philosophic primacy of the self rests on a leap of faith; and second that its religious centrality cannot ultimately satisfy the transcendental thirst that it kindles. The book constructively inquires into the artistic paths that lead away from this anthropocentrism. Art, it is often said, is the religion of the modern secular mind. This study argues that there are good reasons for this status. Taking seriously the age-old connection between art and religion, the book presents just how the spiritual is active in the artistic experience, whether of religious or secular stamp. Artworks are attempts to overcome the limits of expression and knowledge, hence of the human standpoint. The Religion of Reality is not an attempt to resuscitate the religion ofart; rather it is a demonstration of the religious in art.

The Horizon: A History of Our Infinite Longing (University of California Press 2010)

What is a horizon? A line where land meets sky? The end of the world or the beginning of perception? In this brilliant, engaging, and stimulating history, Didier Maleuvre journeys to the outer reaches of human experience and probes philosophy, religion, and art to understand our struggle and fascination with limits—of life, knowledge, existence, and death. Horizons delineate the physical world and give our lives shape, purpose, and meaning; yet history provides a record of humanity’s instinctual urge to transcend boundaries and seek what lies beyond. Maleuvre sweeps us through a vast cultural landscape, enabling us to experience each stopping place as the cusp of a limitless journey, whether he is discussing the works of Picasso, Gothic architecture, Beethoven, or General Relativity. If, as Aristotle said, philosophy begins in wonder, then this remarkable book shows us how wonder—the urge to know beyond the conceivable—is itself the engine of culture.
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June 16, 2010 Posted by | Symposium, Workshop | | Leave a comment

Reminder re Iranian Miniature workshop-

With Hossein Fallahi and his son Behzad, next Sunday (June 7th) from 10am  in Core Room One – please bring watercolours if you have them (we will get a couple of sets in) , some sketch paper and a piece of Fabriano or Stenbach 100gsm watercolour paper and the smallest brushes you have. They will have trad cat hair brushes for sale and some camel bone boxes(to paint on) for sale as well. We will provide some materials, but bring any of the above if you happen to have them. They will begin with a short intro lecture. Places are limited to those who have already signed up, Thanks, Ruth

May 28, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized, Workshop | , | 1 Comment

Iranian Miniature Painting Workshop Sunday 7 June – confirm your participation.

Places are limited now (Mon1 June) to those who have already signed up.

Workshop led by Hossein Fallahi and his son Behzad, next Sunday (June 7th) from 10am  in Core Room One

Time; 10am – 3pm Sunday 7 June 2009

Place; ANU SoA Core Room One

Master; Hossein Fallahi with his son Behzard ‘master in training’

Materials; Please bring watercolours if you have them (we will get a couple of sets in) , some sketch paper and a piece of Fabriano or Stenbach 100gsm watercolour paper and the smallest brushes you have (Sizes 0, 000, etc). They will have trad cat hair brushes for sale and some camel bone boxes(to paint on) for sale as well. We will provide some materials, but bring any of the above if you happen to have them. They will begin with a short intro lecture.

Hossein Fallahi "Hafez and Shahkhenabat" 2005 (private collection)

Hossein Fallahi "Hafez and Shahkhenabat" 2005 (private collection)

Hossein Fallahi, the master of painting, was born in Esfahan in 1938. After primary education in 1951 he began to learn miniature painting under thesupervision of a celebrated master of Persian miniature, Ali Sajadi who was a noted student ofHajmossaver al-molk.

Miniature was painted in Mogol, Safavid and Kajar style in the miniature studio of Ali Sajadi. In 1981 Hossein Fallahi began miniature work by himself after the demise of the master. With the foundation of The Naghsh-e Jahan gallery in 1995 he began miniature painting in traditional style accompanied by his fellow members and his own students.

The paints used in this gallery are mineral such as Azure, Turquoise, Colcothar, Indigo and plant paint such as Saffron, Henna and Alizarin.

The miniature paint brush is made of Persian cat’s hair and pigeon’s feather. the material on which the miniature is painted is camel bone and pressed camel bone powder for bigger sizes, also hand made paper or ancient paper, leather shell and rarely on ivory. The painting subjects are based on Persian culture. Some of them are based on poems of Persian poets such as Omar Khayyam, Hafiz, Saadi, Firdowsi and Moulavi…

May 14, 2009 Posted by | Workshop | , | 8 Comments